The F.U.N. Quotient… in which Fr Darryl autotunes the Church & Pope Francis (very fun & energetic!)

Fr Darryl is one of the many podcasting priests around the world. Here’s one of his latest video creations.

Follow Fr Darryl Millette at SaskaPriest.

Got 5 mins? Watch this great video about St Gianna Beretta Molla – a 20th century saint!

Preparing for the World Meeting of Families, Salt and Light  of Toronto produced this video about this heroic saint. To me, St Gianna exemplifies the feminine genius. You might want to listen to my Among Women podcasts that profile her life, listed below. But for now, enjoy this!

St. Gianna Molla – World Meeting of Families 2015 from saltandlighttv on Vimeo.

Among Women 161: Catholic Pediatricians Make a Difference

Among Women 11: Hear one of the earliest AW podcasts featuring a bio of St Gianna Molla

This makes me think… about who we are…

Will there be times when the Lord still reveals areas in our lives that need to change? Yes, of course. But His conviction is about what we do, not about who we are.

-Holley Gerth-

This makes me think… about qualifying my alone moments

Finding Solitude

All human beings are alone. No other person will completely feel like we do, think like we do, act like we do. Each of us is unique, and our aloneness is the other side of our uniqueness. The question is whether we let our aloneness become loneliness or whether we allow it to lead us into solitude. Loneliness is painful; solitude is peaceful. Loneliness makes us cling to others in desperation; solitude allows us to respect others in their uniqueness and create community.

Letting our aloneness grow into solitude and not into loneliness is a lifelong struggle. It requires conscious choices about whom to be with, what to study, how to pray, and when to ask for counsel. But wise choices will help us to find the solitude where our hearts can grow in love.

-Henri J.M. Nouwen, Bread for the Journey- 

9 Days for Life: Join the Novena and Share it!

9 Days for Life: Join the Novena and Share it!

The US Bishops are encouraging us to join in prayer, penance, and pilgrimage to protect life in our nation. Sign up to pray the novena and to receive other prompts by text, email, and more at the USCCB website.

The annual novena “9 Days for Life” takes place Saturday, January 17 – Sunday, January 25. Pray for the respect and protection of all human life with new intentions, brief reflections, and more each day. Download the novena online, or participate through Facebook, email, text message or an app. Join at www.9daysforlife.com! 

I can’t be at the March for Life due to obligations I have at my church, but I can “be there” in prayer — so can you! Let’s do this!

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A few years later, I’m still tripping up on the Mass responses

Ok, I admit it, some days, especially when I’m tired, I forget and revert unconsciously to the “old” Mass parts.

Even though I’ve written articles on the subject of the new Roman Missal and helped explain the changes and their theological meanings to others, I still get tongue-tied. I still trip up and sometimes just fall into the old patterns of the Gloria and the Creed. I’m trying to be gentle with my midlife self — it took me years to learn all those prayers; I’ve been praying them since childhood. So now I’m finding its taking me a few years to learn the modifications to the prayers. I still cannot, off the top of my head, pray all three different Memorial Acclamations. If I were a Jeopardy contestant, I’d fail this category.

So what to do?

I’m just having to be more intentional, and actively keep using the missal. It certainly keeps me more focused on the words I pray, rather than rattling them off.

It is also keeping me humble. I thought this would be easier. Much of it is coming together for me, but then I skip a line in the Creed, or forget to say “Lord of hosts” in the Sanctus.

I ever so relate to the centurion’s claim to Jesus: “Lord, I am not worthy that you should enter under my roof, but only say the word and my soul shall be healed.”

Lord, heal me of my frustration toward my slow adjustment… only say the word so that I may say the words I need to pray in union with your good people who seem to have adapted better than I have! Lord let me never forget you, even if I’m forgetting the changes to these prayers now and again. Amen.

This makes me think… God is restless for us

Praying without ceasing means: never losing contact with God, letting ourselves be constantly touched by him in the depths of our hearts and, in this way, being penetrated by his light. Only someone who actually knows God can lead others to God. Only someone who leads people to God leads them along the path of life.

The restless heart of which we spoke earlier, echoing Saint Augustine, is the heart that is ultimately satisfied with nothing less than God, and in this way becomes a loving heart. Our heart is restless for God and remains so, even if every effort is made today, by means of most effective anaesthetizing methods, to deliver people from this unrest. But not only are we restless for God: God’s heart is restless for us. God is waiting for us. He is looking for us. He knows no rest either, until he finds us. God’s heart is restless, and that is why he set out on the path towards us – to Bethlehem, to Calvary, from Jerusalem to Galilee and on to the very ends of the earth. God is restless for us, he looks out for people willing to “catch” his unrest, his passion for us, people who carry within them the searching of their own hearts and at the same time open themselves to be touched by God’s search for us. Dear friends, this was the task of the Apostles: to receive God’s unrest for man and then to bring God himself to man. 

The wise men followed the star. Through the language of creation, they discovered the God of history. To be sure – the language of creation alone is not enough. Only God’s word, which we encounter in sacred Scripture, was able to mark out their path definitively. Creation and Scripture, reason and faith, must come together, so as to lead us forward to the living God. There has been much discussion over what kind of star it was that the wise men were following. Some suggest a planetary constellation, or a supernova, that is to say one of those stars that is initially quite weak, in which an inner explosion releases a brilliant light for a certain time, or a comet, etc. This debate we may leave to the experts. The great star, the true supernova that leads us on, is Christ himself. He is as it were the explosion of God’s love, which causes the great white light of his heart to shine upon the world. And we may add: the wise men from the East, who feature in today’s Gospel, like all the saints, have themselves gradually become constellations of God that mark out the path. In all these people, being touched by God’s word has, as it were, released an explosion of light, through which God’s radiance shines upon our world and shows us the path. The saints are stars of God, by whom we let ourselves be led to him for whom our whole being longs.

Benedict XVI, Homily, Epiphany 2012.