Happy Thanksgiving from our home to yours…*

Happy Thanksgiving from our home to yours…*

So many things to be thankful to God for this year… from the big things to the little things…

My Bob and my all grown up family…

Ok, we gotta get better at this. This is the last photo I have of us -- from May?? (before I cut off my hair!)

At a friend’s wedding in May.

 

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Katie, Bobby, Peter… visiting Pete in DC

 

My married daughter and son-in-love -- celebrated one year!

My married daughter and son-in-love — celebrated one year!

 

For renewed health for my mom… (thanks for all the prayers!)

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For new employment for Bob… yay!

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And continued free-lance style work for me

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Speaking to women earlier this month on Long Island. (I Love New York!)

And the book award from the Catholic Press Association…

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And book signings…

And the all people and places I have been able to meet with… both near and far…

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on WQOM

For fun

with Lisa Hendey,,,

with Lisa Hendey

 

A toast with Maria Johnson at the Red Lion Tavern in Stockbridge MA, Oct 2014.

with Maria Johnson

And for ministry opportunities around the US and Canada…

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With Among Women listeners in California

 

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With the team leaders in the Diocese of Springfield IL

 

Me with Fr James Mallon, pastor of Saint Benedict Parish

With Fr James Mallon, pastor of Saint Benedict Parish, and author, from Halifax, Nova Scotia

 

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At the Oklahoma City Catholic Women’s Conference

 

And for continuing education

Our Lady of Divine Providence, House of Prayer, Clearwater, FL

Our Lady of Divine Providence, House of Prayer, in Clearwater, FL

And another year behind the microphone at Among Women…

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Thank you to all my readers and listeners! May you enjoy a happy and holy holiday!

*Yes, that is an actual New England turkey spotted in full plumage.

Among Women 187: Saintly Models for Charity, Diligence, and Temperance

Among Women 187: Saintly Models for Charity, Diligence, and Temperance

This week on Among Women, I interview author and Catholic Fire blogger, Jean Heimann. We discuss her blogging life and her new book, Seven Saints for Seven Virtues. This new book profiles saints who model the virtues we all need. Traditionally, Catholics have trusted there are seven heavenly virtues that help defeat the seven deadly sins — the root sins responsible for all our sins and mistakes in life.

UnknownOn this episode of Among Women, we focus on Blessed Teresa of Calcutta, St John Paul II, and St Augustine who shine in the areas of charity, diligence, and temperance. Charity, diligence, and temperance are virtues that help Christians fight the vices of pride, sloth or laziness, and lust or lack of self-control (especially when it comes to sex, food, drink or any other over-indulgence).   You might want to know what saints and virtues the rest of the book covers.

They are:

Blessed Teresa of Calcutta, Model of Charity
St. Agnes, Model of Chastity
St. John Paul II,  Model of Diligence
St. Joseph, Model of Humility
St. Catherine of Siena, Model of Kindness
St. Monica, Model of Patience
St. Augustine, Model of Temperance

Listen to Among Women today!

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This makes me think… how countercultural Christian faith really is… or, be like a salmon

A few years ago I was on holiday in Scotland and saw an amazing sight: thousands of wild salmon in a river, swimming upstream, racing ahead, jumping in the air to get past rocks and over the boulders. Salmon, I am told, lay their eggs upstream, and once hatched, the new salmon swim down to the sea on a huge journey to the feeding grounds off Greenland. They then have two months to get back to the river they were born in, to lay their own eggs and after to die. How on earth they know where their home-river is a mystery, but that’s why you see the amazing sight of fish swimming upstream, jumping in the air, and racing against the current. 

It made me think of two things: That we are a bit like salmon. Deep down in every human heart is a spiritual homing-device. We are made for God and made for heaven. Our home is with him, and our hearts are restless until we find him. But secondly, to find Him, to find Him in our busy, affluent, secular culture, we must swim upstream against the current. To find God, to develop friendship with him, to live the life of Christ, to reach heaven our home, we have to be countercultural, to be different, to create space and time, to make the effort, even to suffer.

-Bishop Philip Egan-
Bishop of Portsmouth, UK
From The Sower Review, July-Sept 2013

The F.U.N. Quotient… having fun at work edition…

Honestly, I went a bit weak in the knees watching these angles.

And just in case you needed something more lighthearted…

#GraceOfYESDay… who inspires me? Intercessors, Helpers, Missionaries, Caregivers, Mercy-bearers

#GraceOfYESDay… who inspires me? Intercessors, Helpers, Missionaries, Caregivers, Mercy-bearers

7CqeBIn honor of the”Grace of YES” day… (inspired by Lisa Hendey’s book, The Grace of Yes):

The people who inspire me with their yes include …

Intercessors: the men and women who silently, and particularly, intercede for others with their hidden prayers. I know I have been the grateful recipient of many prayers lifted to heaven.

Helping Servants: The people I know who quietly work in the ministry of the St Vincent de Paul Society in my parish and diocese. Their generous and thoughtful work brings what’s needed most to homes in my town. There are other ministries listed here, in Catholic Digest, that are worthy of our support. 

Missionaries: Full-time missionaries, like Jonathan and Kristen of Family Mission Company,  and campus ministers like Michelle Ducker, and FOCUS.  And part-time missionaries like Totus Tuus programs.

Caregivers: Those who bring relief and care to the elderly, the infirm, the mentally ill, and those who have no family to belong to.

May the grace of YES to God in our lives lead us to perform the corporal and spiritual works of mercy

The corporal works of mercy include:

  • To feed the hungry;
  • To give drink to the thirsty;
  • To clothe the naked;
  • To harbour the harbourless;
  • To visit the sick;
  • To ransom the captive;
  • To bury the dead.

The spiritual works of mercy are:

  • To instruct the ignorant;
  • To counsel the doubtful;
  • To admonish sinners;
  • To bear wrongs patiently;
  • To forgive offences willingly;
  • To comfort the afflicted;
  • To pray for the living and the dead.

Finally, the grace of yes is “a vocation to love”, as St Therese of Lisieux once declared. Whatever our vocational state, let us be faithful Marriage partners and faithful priests and religious, and faithful individuals who are single for the Lord. May our “yeses” bring the work of mercy to the world.

 

Francis on Complimentarity, Marriage, and Family Life #Humanum

Here is a portion of the text of Pope Francis’ greetings to the Humanum participants:

You must admit that “complementarity” does not roll lightly off the tongue! Yet it is a word into which many meanings are compressed. It refers to situations where one of two things adds to, completes, or fulfills a lack in the other. But complementarity is much more than that. Yet complementarity is more than this. Christians find its deepest meaning in the first Letter to the Corinthians where Saint Paul tells us that the Spirit has endowed each of us with different gifts so that-just as the human body’s members work together for the good of the whole-everyone’s gifts can work together for the benefit of each. (cf. 1 Cor. 12). To reflect upon “complementarity” is nothing less than to ponder the dynamic harmonies at the heart of all Creation. This is a big word, harmony. All complementarities were made by our Creator, so the Author of harmony achieves this harmony.

It is fitting that you have gathered here in this international colloquium to explore the complementarity of man and woman. This complementarity is a root of marriage and family. For the family grounded in marriage is the first school where we learn to appreciate our own and others’ gifts, and where we begin to acquire the arts of cooperative living. For most of us, the family provides the principal place where we can aspire to greatness as we strive to realize our full capacity for virtue and charity. At the same time, as we know, families give rise to tensions: between egoism and altruism, reason and passion, immediate desires and long-range goals. But families also provide frameworks for resolving such tensions. This is important. When we speak of complementarity between man and woman in this context, let us not confuse that term with the simplistic idea that all the roles and relations of the two sexes are fixed in a single, static pattern. Complementarity will take many forms as each man and woman brings his or her distinctive contributions to their marriage and to the formation of their children — his or her personal richness, personal charisma. Complementarity becomes a great wealth. It is not just a good thing but it is also beautiful.

We know that today marriage and the family are in crisis. We now live in a culture of the temporary, in which more and more people are simply giving up on marriage as a public commitment. This revolution in manners and morals has often flown the flag of freedom, but in fact it has brought spiritual and material devastation to countless human beings, especially the poorest and most vulnerable.

Evidence is mounting that the decline of the marriage culture is associated with increased poverty and a host of other social ills, disproportionately affecting women, children and the elderly. It is always they who suffer the most in this crisis.

The crisis in the family has produced an ecological crisis, for social environments, like natural environments, need protection. And although the human race has come to understand the need to address conditions that menace our natural environments, we have been slower to recognize that our fragile social environments are under threat as well, slower in our culture, and also in our Catholic Church. It is therefore essential that we foster a new human ecology.

It is necessary first topromote the fundamental pillars that govern a nation: its non-material goods. The family is the foundation of co-existence and a remedy against social fragmentation. Children have a right to grow up in a family with a father and a mother capable of creating a suitable environment for the child’s development and emotional maturity. That is why I stressed in the Apostolic Exhortation Evangelii Gaudium that the contribution of marriage to society is “indispensable”; that it “transcends the feelings and momentary needs of the couple.” (n. 66) And that is why I am grateful to you for your Colloquium’s emphasis on the benefits that marriage can provide to children, the spouses themselves, and to society.

In these days, as you embark on a reflection on the beauty of complementarity between man and woman in marriage, I urge you to lift up yet another truth about marriage: that permanent commitment to solidarity, fidelity and fruitful love responds to the deepest longings of the human heart. I urge you to bear in mind especially the young people, who represent our future. Commit yourselves, so that our youth do not give themselves over to the poisonous environment of the temporary, but rather be revolutionaries with the courage to seek true and lasting love, going against the common pattern.

Do not fall into the trap of being swayed by political notion. Family is an anthropological fact – a socially and culturally related fact. We cannot qualify it based on ideological notions or concepts important only at one time in history. We can’t think of conservative or progressive notions. Family is a family. It can’t be qualified by ideological notions. Family is per se. It is a strength per se.

More here.

This makes me think… about the divine face, the incarnation…

The Divine Image

by William Blake (1757-1827)

To Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love
All pray in their distress;
And to these virtues of delight
Return their thankfulness.

 

For Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love
Is God, our father dear,
And Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love
Is Man, his child and care.

 

For Mercy has a human heart,
Pity a human face,
And Love, the human form divine,
And Peace, the human dress.

 

Then every man, of every clime,
That prays in his distress,
Prays to the human form divine,
Love, Mercy, Pity, Peace.

 

And all must love the human form,
In heathen, Turk, or Jew;
Where Mercy, Love, and Pity dwell
There God is dwelling too.
I write for Catholic Digest; Make this your easiest-to-give Christmas present…

I write for Catholic Digest; Make this your easiest-to-give Christmas present…

imageFor a few years now, I’ve been privileged to be a columnist in the Catholic Digest. My space is “From the Catechism”. (I always thought it should be called “The Pat in the Cat” — but I’m grateful to my editor, not only for the work each month, but for her good taste in not posting every title I recommend to her.)

The Catechism of the Catholic Church is not on everyone’s reading list, I know this. That’s why I love to introduce it in snippets. Often I highlight themes from the liturgical year or from the themes captured in each issue. It’s a page or two of faith and Catholic doctrine served in easy digestible bites. Each column I write offers something positive and inspiring from the book I’ve grown to love since it first came out in English is 1994.

Now and then, I’ll write a feature besides the column. Last year I shared about my book and spiritual motherhood. In a coming issue, I’m writing about healing.

I not only write for Catholic Digest, I also subscribe!

Sure, I totally love the seasonal gift guides, and the books it recommends. But there’s more! This past year, there was a special issue commemorating the canonization of Saints John XXIII and John Paul II.
photoFor me, it’s the family-friendly Catholic content that wins me over. And it’s beautiful shot and laid out with photos and lovely fonts that make reading it nicer than ever. Once in a while I try one of the recipes…

This new issue has Mary Ellen Barrett, my recent guest on Among Women, talking about thoughtful gift giving, Daria Sockey writing about purgatory, Sean Patrick describing about growing up Catholic in America, and Tom Hoopes with his take on the ice bucket challenge with an amazing story of his Mom and her legacy despite her battle with ALS. And who knew that actor Ray Liotta, from the movie The Identical was a faithful guy? Susie Lloyd’s got that interview.

Some of Catholic Digest’s content is online after the magazine publishes, but not as much as you’d like. So its best to just subscribe. You can even get a free trial.

Think Christmas, good people! This is a gift that keeps giving. And it helps to add salt and light to the culture around us!

This is the gift to send to your distant relatives — think of the shipping you’ll save and the smiles you’ll bring!

imageThis is the gift to give that religion teacher your children are so fond of, or your auntie in Florida and your Godmother in Tucson, or that young family down the block. This is the gift you could send to all the Catholic newlyweds you know. Or your dear old Mom and Dad.

Really. Subscribe for yourself and for someone you love. 

People ask me all the time for Catholic Resources and I tell them what I like. Catholic Digest is something I like so much that I work for them. If you like the work I do, as a writer and a speaker, or as a podcaster, here’s one way you can support that. Really. Thank a Catholic writer today.