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Atop a white page in the new year… “Lord do with me what You will…”

Atop a white page in the new year… “Lord do with me what You will…”

“I think of this new year as a white page given to me by your Father, on which he will write, day by day, whatever His divine good pleasure has planned. I shall now write at the top of the page, with complete confidence: Domine, fac de me sicut vis, “Lord, do with me what You will”, and at the bottom I already write my Amen to all the proposals of Your divine will. Yes Lord, yes to all the joys, the sorrows, the graces, the hardships prepared for me, which You will reveal to me day by day. Grant that my Amen may be the Pascal Amen, always followed by the Alleluia, uttered wholeheartedly in the joy of a complete gift. Give me Your love and Your grace and I shall be rich enough.”

-Sr Carmela of the Holy Spirit, OCD*

IMG_1087This seems a perfect quote on this Solemnity that honors the Blessed Virgin Mary as the Mother of God. Here in the heart of the Christmas season we venerate Jesus’ first disciple, the one who modeled for us what it means to give one’s full “yes” to our Father God, one who lived wholehearted within His Will.

*as found in Divine Intimacy

Third Sunday of Advent Music – “Ready the Way”, by Curtis Stephan

In this video, the artist/composer talks about the meaning behind the song for a few minutes. If you just would like to hear the song, skip to 5:26 in the video. I’m liking this one because of its simplicity… I can just sing it as I go through my day.

Thank you, Veterans! A tribute to Fr Emil Kapaun, Military Chaplain

Thank you, Veterans! A tribute to Fr Emil Kapaun, Military Chaplain

I have this memory of helping my Mom packing goodies to ship to Vietnam where her younger brother was serving in the Army Infantry. In all I had four uncles who were in the military. Two were her younger brothers, and two were my father’s older brothers who were in the Navy. Today, I know many Vets from my generation. Many friends have sons and daughters serving our country at this very moment. I have the names of three of them on my prayer board.

I’m a grateful recipient of their sacrifice and service. So are you.

Let us be grateful when we meet them in person, and pray for them when we are apart.

You might like this story about military chaplain Fr Emil Kapaun…

 

UPDATE 9.13.2015: A article I missed earlier describes the steps toward canonization being made regarding Fr Kapaun. From the Register:

On Nov. 9, Bishop Carl Kemme of Wichita, Kan., delivered a report on the life of Father Kapaun to the Vatican’s Congregation for the Causes of Saints. More than 90 pilgrims accompanied him to Rome.

Bishop Kemme and priests from the diocese personally delivered the nearly 1,100-page report on Father Kapaun’s life, officially called a positio, to Cardinal Angelo Amato, the prefect of the congregation. This step had been in the making since 1993, when the Vatican named Father Kapaun (pronounced Ka-PON), who was a priest of the Wichita Diocese, a “Servant of God.”

Once the Vatican studies and approves the positio, the heroic Army chaplain, who gave his life for the soldiers in his charge, can either be named “Venerable” or beatified as “Blessed.”

While the positio can lead to Father Kapaun being named a “Venerable,” it can also mean he can be beatified and declared “Blessed.” The reason is that the diocese is investigating some alleged miracles.

“We have two cases,” Father Hotze noted. Both came to light in previous years. One involved a 12-year-old girl who was near death; the other was a severely injured college track athlete — doctors expected him to die. Both recovered rapidly after prayers seeking the intercession of Father Kapaun. Doctors said both recoveries were medically unexplainable.

“If they’re able to get the miracle accepted and approved along with it [the positio’s approval], that will also mean being beatified,” explained Father Hotze. Both processes are going to proceed simultaneously.

Read more at the Register. 

 

Splinter from the Cross – this little poem never ceases to inspire me

Splinter from the Cross IMG_3401

Little headaches, little heartaches
Little griefs of every day.
Little trials and vexations,
How they throng around our way!
One great cross, immense and heavy,
so it seems to our weak will,
Might be borne with resignation,
But these many small ones kill.
Yet all life is formed of small things,
Little leaves, make up the trees,
Many tiny drops of water
Blending, make the mighty seas.
Let us not then by impatience
Mar the beauty of the whole,
But for love of Jesus bear all
In the silence of our soul.
Asking Him for grace sufficient
To sustain us through each loss,
And to treasure each small offering
As a splinter from His Cross.

– Author Unknown –

Today is the feast of the Triumph of the Cross, as I grew up calling it. Today it is the feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross. But to my meager mind, if you do not understand what a triumph this is, you will never know how to exalt in the cross.

A couple years back I wrote a series of posts related to this theme. 

The F.U.N. Quotient… this one’s for the Mom’s

The F.U.N. Quotient… this one’s for the Mom’s

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And if you’ve raised toddler’s, this one’s for you. Hope you smile!

 
Finally, here’s a cheerful soundtrack for your day!

Happy Divine Mercy Sunday! Love and mercy has taken form and has a name: Jesus Christ!

[W]e live in a time of deep worldly skepticism about any “bigger plan” or higher meaning to human experience. For many people, the human person is little more than an accident of evolution; carbon atoms with an attitude. In other words, for many people we have no higher purpose than whatever meaning we create for ourselves.

In an era of sophisticated technology and material wealth, that kind of reasoning without God can sound plausible. But in the end it’s too small a vision of who we are as women and men. It undermines human dignity. It leaves starving souls hungry. It is not true.

In fact, we yearn for meaning.

With so many conflicting answers, our age is a confusing time. Many people today honestly seek meaning, but don’t know whom to trust or where to commit their lives.

Amid this uncertainty, Christians are people who trust in Jesus Christ. Despite the ambiguities of human history, the Catholic way of hope and joy, love and service grounds itself in an encounter with Jesus. As Saint John Paul II proclaimed in his first encyclical: “in man’s history, [the] revelation of love and mercy has taken the form and name: that of Jesus Christ. Everything follows from that. Jesus Christ is the basis of Christian faith.” – Love is Our Mission, Catechesis for the World Meeting of Families, 2015