The F.U.N. Quotient… amazing astronomy, or that’s a God thing…

The F.U.N. Quotient… amazing astronomy, or that’s a God thing…

When I was kid I had a telescope and would go out in the backyard and look at the craters of the moon. It was the Space Age and many from my generation dreamed about working for NASA:  I was one of those children whose 1969 summer was punctuated by Neil Armstrong’s historic moon walk.

I’ve been a fan of God’s Creation ever since, so when friends on Facebook started sharing the NASA Astronomy Photo of the Day, I just got lost for a while. I want to own a photo of the Helix Nebula, the “eye” you see at the top of the page. Popular culture has nicknamed it “the Eye of God” and it fits, if you ask me. Not that we ever confuse God with His Creation. But it is interesting that this object is very close to the earth — 700 light years away.

Other amazing photographs:

The Butterfly Nebula

The Crab Nebula (And the video measuring its expansion over time.)

Aurora over Acadia National Park in Maine.

The Milky Way over Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming

Supernova

Ultradeep Field – in which galaxies look like “colorful pieces of candy”.  

Finally, on a completely different note:  the sounds of space. 

:::

Banner: Image credit: C. R. O’Dell, (Vanderbilt) et al. ESANOAONASA

Review: “The Grace of Yes” by Lisa Hendey is about Answering God’s Action in Our Lives

Review: “The Grace of Yes” by Lisa Hendey is about Answering God’s Action in Our Lives

9781594714726v2.jpg.232xLisa Hendey has a lot to say about the Good Stuff — the sunny side of life — about God, graces, and generous living. Yet it does not come from Thinking Positive or a Pollyanna’s World View. No, this goodness flows from a life of gratitude lived in touch with her core Catholic belief in blessings — the graces that God gives her. And that’s the implicit challenge of the The Grace of Yes… Are you ready to honestly examine God’s divine action in your life — his graces — and respond in a way that he can use you for his glory — his will?

Longtime readers might know Lisa Hendey as the friendly Californian CatholicMom.com founder, an A-list conference speaker, a best-selling author, and a gracious media maven. She always writes with warmth and kindness, and a girl-next-door thoughtfulness. The truth is, when you read The Grace of Yes, you still come away away with that impression. She really is nice and friendly and thoughtful and generous, and yet, in this new book, she is vulnerable enough to let us see what really makes her tick. Long before Hendey became a recognizable face and name in Catholic new evangelization circles, she was a woman who simply chose to take small steps, sometimes haltingly and sometimes boldly, toward God and his goodness.

Lisa Hendey has encountered God’s blessings and gifts, and opened them for herself. They have, in turn, opened her to become a more generous and self-emptying person. She allows her life story to be Exhibit A in showing us what it looks like to be slowly re-created by God’s grace… to give God permission to write the script for our lives.

Everybody has a story about God’s movement in their lives. Yet few of us have the sensitivity to see it and the courage to test and examine it and, then, choose to live it. We’re really good at offering God partial yeses, or maybes, or could-I-get-back-to-you-on-that-God? We may have head knowledge about God, but we fear moving beyond to heart knowledge. One part memoir, and one part a come-and-try-this-for-yourself book of virtues, Hendey shows us where she has found the heart knowledge. She describes the ups and downs and zigzags of her own growth in virtue as an adult, from yuppiedom to motherhood, from web mistress to media missionary, from comfortable suburban dwelling to walking the blood-soaked hills of post-genocide Rwanda.

Hendey’s book offers this keen metaphor from St Augustine: the higher your structure is to be, the deeper must be its foundation. This rootedness in God — this needed depth — is an on-going thread in Hendey’s writing. Each chapter unpacks how she choose to go deeper with God during the rough and the smooth. The Grace of Yes chronicles where Hendey’s yeses to God have brought her thus far, and it reveals her findings: it is a net gain when we err on the side of generosity. That means giving God priority. This is especially true when it comes to the challenge of doing new things, rather than shrinking back in fear.

The Grace of Yes examines “Eight Virtues for Generous Living”: Belief, Generativity, Creativity, Integrity, Humility, Vulnerabililty, “No”, and Rebirth. Each chapter offers personal reflections in Hendey’s on-going conversion, as well as real life examples from people she knows and people in the news. Thoughtful study questions and prayers at the close of each chapter deepen the book’s message.

Hendey’s thesis for a generous life asks us to be generous with God first, by responding to God’s actions with “Your will, my yes.”

Ultimately, this is the reply that every believer is invited to make — to choose to live a life in God and with God and through God… whether you are a celebrity author on the speaking circuit, or the gal or guy next door. Fortunately, there’s grace in abundance for any heart willing to make that leap of faith.

 

 

 

This makes me think… about heaven in this month of holy souls…

There

by Mary Coleridge

There, in that other world, what waits for me?
What shall I find after that other birth?
No stormy, tossing, foaming, smiling sea,
But a new earth.

No sun to mark the changing of the days,
No slow, soft falling of the alternate night,
No moon, no star, no light upon my ways,
Only the Light.

No gray cathedral, wide and wondrous fair,
That I may tread where all my fathers trod,
Nay, nay, my soul, no house of God is there,
But only God.

That ain’t no way to treat a lady — Maddie and Tae’s “Girl In A Country Song”

Music lyrics degrading to both women and men have long been present in the music industry at large. I’m happy to see a few inside-the-industry professionals call their fellow songwriters out on the subject… and using humor to get their point across. Maddie and Tae’s breakout country music hit and video “Girl in a Country Song” captures-by-parody a few of country’s hottest tune lyrics that dehumanize and objectify women. Meanwhile “Girl in a Country Song” points to the essence of the feminine genius — how woman is unique and of inestimable value.

What I like most about the song is that the singers are calling on men to shape up and pay attention to the whole person of a woman. As I wrote recently concerning gentlemen, respecting the dignity of women — and men — is the real glue between the sexes.

From  Maddie and Tae’s  website:

“Girl in a Country Song” is the pair’s take on the reality of what men say they’re expecting from the fairer sex. “Boys we love you, we want to look good, but it’s not all we’re good for,” MADDIE says.

The tune pokes fun at a few songs you may know, but the girls – who Rolling Stone named one of the 10 New Artists You Need to Know – assure you, it’s all in good fun. “We love every single one of these guys,” TAE adds. “We don’t want to bring them down, we just want to lift the ladies up as well.”

“We are girls with something to say,” MADDIE says. “We were brought up to know how we should be treated. We’ve got a new perspective that we think is relatable. We also have a vulnerable side that you hear in the music. We’re not saying, ‘we’re girls and we’re taking over the world!’ We’re just saying a little something different that hasn’t really been said.”

These women make a good point in denouncing song lyrics that thing-a-fies them and reduces them to sex objects. Yet, in a blatant comedic role-reversal on the single’s video, these gals do the same “thing” to men to make their point. I’m not pleased they stooped to committing a similar faux pas in their video’s content, since the lyrics alone — what caught my ear in the first place on country radio — generally state the case against derogatory lyrics.

“Girl In A Country Song”

(“No country music was harmed in the making of this song, this is only a test-t-t”)

Well I wish I had some shoes on my two bare feet
And it’s gettin’ kinda cold in these painted on cut off jeans
I hate the way this bikini top chafes
Do I really have to wear it all day? (Yeah baby)

I hear you over there on your tailgate whistlin’ [*whistle*]
Sayin’, “Hey girl”
But you know I ain’t listenin’
Cause I got a name
And to you it ain’t “pretty little thing”, “honey” or “baby”
Yeah it’s drivin’ me red-red-red-red-red-red-red neck crazy

[Chorus:]
Bein’ the girl in a country song
How in the world did it go so wrong?
Like all we’re good for
Is looking good for you and your friends on the weekend
Nothing more
We used to get a little respect
Now we’re lucky if we even get
To climb up in your truck, keep my mouth shut and ride along
And be the girl in a country song

Well shakin’ my moneymaker ain’t ever made me a dime
And there ain’t no sugar for you in this shaker of mine
Tell me one more time, “you gotta get you some of that”
Sure I’ll slide on over, but you’re gonna get slapped (Hah!)
These days it ain’t easy being that

[Chorus:]
Girl in a country song
How in the world did it go so wrong?
Like all we’re good for
Is looking good for you and your friends on the weekend
Nothing more
We used to get a little respect
Now we’re lucky if we even get
To climb up in your truck, keep my mouth shut and ride along
And be the girl in a country song (Yeah, yeah baby)

Aww no, Conway and George Strait
Never did it this way
Back in the old days
Aww y’all, we ain’t a cliché
That ain’t no way
To treat a lady

[Chorus:]
Like a girl in a country song
How in the world did it go so wrong?
Like all we’re good for
Is looking good for you and your friends on the weekend
Nothing more
We used to get a little respect
Now we’re lucky if we even get
To climb up in your truck, keep my mouth shut and ride along
Down some old dirt road we don’t even wanna be on
And be the girl in a country song

(“Yeah baby, I ain’t your tan legged Juliet. Can I put on some real clothes now?”)

Aww, no

 

 

 

Venerating the Saints: Relics and Real Life (a photo essay)

Venerating the Saints: Relics and Real Life (a photo essay)

As the month of all saints and all souls continues, I thought I’d share some cool photos of relics from some of my travels in recent months.

Relics, honored in the Catholic Church, are the bodies of the saints or objects connected with them or with Our Lord. God has often shown His approval of relics as sacramentals by working miracles through them. Relics deserve to be venerated. The bodies of saints were temples of the Holy Spirit and instruments through which God worked. However, no Catholic is required to believe in miracles [related to relics] any more than one is obliged to believe in private revelations such as those of Lourdes and Fatima. We honor relics by preserving them with reverence, visiting the places were they are enshrined, and praying before them.

The word relic comes from the Latin reliquirae, or “remains.” Relics are classified in three categories. First-class relics are parts of the bodies of saints, or instruments of the Passion (like fragments of the True Cross). Second class relics are objects that have been in close contact with the saints, such as articles of clothing or personal items. In the case of a martyr, the instruments of martyrdom are also considered in this category. Third-class relics are objects like Rosaries or cloths that have been touched to the body of the saint, or to either first or second class relics.

Most prized of all relics are the relics of Christ’s passion, particularly of the cross on which He died.

-Ann Ball, The How-to Book of Sacramentals_

In September, I was a guest at the Chiara Center retreat house, attached to St Francis of Assisi Church, the motherhouse of the Hospital Sisters of St Francis. (Here’s a cool PDF about all the highlights in the St Francis church.) St Francis of Assisi church is loaded with relics. Its sanctuary is pictured in the banner photo above. Besides praying before the Blessed Sacrament every day, I was privileged to view and pray before their collection of relics. Yes, I experienced Catholic geek overload. And it was wonderful.

I’m gonna supersize these photos so you can see the details… or as many details as my cameral phone can allow. (Note: if you are viewing on a phone, you might want to check back later on a larger screen to appreciate the larger frames. Some photos might be cut severely on a phone-sized screen. You can also click on the photos to view them.)

Reliquary of the True Cross

Reliquary of the True Cross

 

Close up of the splinter fragment of the True Cross.  (Here in Boston, our cathedral of the Holy Cross has a miniature fragment compared to this one.)

Close up of the splinter fragment of the True Cross.
(Here in Boston, our cathedral of the Holy Cross has a miniature fragment compared to this one.)

Documentation of the relic

Documentation of the relic coming from Pope Pius IX.

Reliquary for St Francis of Assisi, the church patron and patron of the Hospital Sisters' religious order.

Reliquary for St Francis of Assisi, the church patron and patron of the Hospital Sisters’ religious order.

St Francis of Assisi

St Francis of Assisi, relic.

Here’s a major relic of St Felicitas ( Oh yes, you know here — Felicity  — the martyr mentioned in the Roman Canon, Eucharistic Prayer I?)

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“For ourselves, too, we ask some share in the fellowship of your apostles and martyrs, with John the Baptist, Stephen, Matthias, Barnabas, (Ignatius, Alexander, Marcellinus, Peter, Felicity, Perpetua, Agatha, Lucy, Agnes, Cecilia, Anastasia) and all the saints.” (Roman Canon)

Documentation of how this first class relic got to Springfield, IL… (a virgin and martyr for the faith)

Documentation of how this first class relic got to Springfield, IL… (a virgin and martyr for the faith)

More here about the how the Mother Superior made this request to have this relic for the motherhouse.

More here about the how the Mother Superior made this request to have this relic for the motherhouse.

The hallway in the Church basement where the relics are exposed in marble and glass displays.

The hallway in the Church basement where the relics are exposed in marble and glass displays.

Can you see all those little discs in the displays. Many many relics to be venerated.

Can you see all those little discs in the displays?  Many many relics to be venerated.

Here’s a few of my favorites…

The 12 Apostles plus the great apostle to the Gentiles, St Paul.

Relics of the 12 Apostles plus the great apostle to the Gentiles, St Paul.

St John of the Cross, relic

St John of the Cross, relic

St Gemma Galgani, relic

St Gemma Galgani, relic

IMG_3542

St Rose of Lima, relic

IMG_3541

Top to Bottom: St Alphonse Liquori, St Bernard, St Louis de Montfort, relics

IMG_3524

St Philomena, relic

IMG_3552

St Teresa of Jesus (St Teresa of Avila), relic.

IMG_3545

St Camillus, relic (ex ossibus = “from the bones”)

IMG_3553

St Kateri Tekakwitha, relic

IMG_3537

Top to Bottom: St Anthony of Padua, St Francis of Assisi, St Clare of Assisi, St Ludov, St Elizabeth of Hungary, relics.

IMG_3529

St Maria Goretti, relic (V.M. = virgin, martyr)

IMG_3526

St Anthony of Padua, relic

IMG_3518

St Pius X, relic

IMG_3520

St Catherine of Siena, relic

Finally, while I was away at spiritual direction school in June, I found a few more relics at Our Lady of Divine Providence, House of Prayer. Took a few photos of my favs.

Our Lady of Divine Providence, House of Prayer, Clearwater, FL

Our Lady of Divine Providence, House of Prayer, Clearwater, FL

IMG_2856

St Padre Pio, relic

IMG_2857

Close – up, St Pio, first class relic

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St Catherine of Siena, relic

IMG_2861

St Teresa of Avila, relic

 

Kind of just makes you want to break out into a Litany of Saints don’t it?

Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, have mercy on us.
Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, hear us.
Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, have mercy on us.
Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, graciously hear us.
God, the Father of heaven,
God the Son, Redeemer of the world,
God the Holy Spirit,
Holy Trinity, one God,
have mercy on us.
have mercy on us.
have mercy on us.
have mercy on us.
Holy Mary,
Holy Mother of God,
Holy Virgin of virgins,
St. Michael,
St. Gabriel,
St. Raphael,
All you Holy Angels and Archangels,
St. John the Baptist,
St. Joseph,
All you Holy Patriarchs and Prophets,
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
St. Peter,
St. Paul,
St. Andrew,
St. James,
St. John,
St. Thomas,
St. James,
St. Philip,
St. Bartholomew,
St. Matthew,
St. Simon,
St. Jude,
St. Matthias,
St. Barnabas,
St. Luke,
St. Mark,
All you holy Apostles and Evangelists,
All you holy Disciples of the Lord,
All you holy Innocents,
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
St. Stephen,
St. Lawrence,
St. Vincent,
Sts. Fabian and Sebastian,
Sts. John and Paul,
Sts. Cosmas and Damian,
All you holy Martyrs,
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
St. Sylvester,
St. Gregory,
St. Ambrose,
St. Augustine,
St. Jerome,
St. Martin,
St. Nicholas,
All you holy Bishops and Confessors,
All you holy Doctors,
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
St. Anthony,
St. Benedict,
St. Bernard,
St. Dominic,
St. Francis,
All you holy Priests and Levites,
All you holy Monks and Hermits,
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
St. Mary Magdalene,
St. Agatha,
St. Lucy,
St. Agnes,
St. Cecilia,
St. Anastasia,
St. Catherine,
St. Clare,
All you holy Virgins and Widows,
All you holy Saints of God,
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
pray for us.
Lord, be merciful,
From all evil,
From all sin,
From your wrath,
From a sudden and unprovided death,
From the snares of the devil,
From anger, hatred, and all ill-will,
From the spirit of uncleanness,
From lightning and tempest,
From the scourge of earthquake,
From plague, famine, and war,
From everlasting death, 
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
By the mystery of your holy Incarnation,
By your Coming,
By your Birth,
By your Baptism and holy fasting,
By your Cross and Passion,
By your Death and Burial,
By your holy Resurrection,
By your wonderful Ascension,
By the coming of the Holy Spirit,
On the day of judgment,
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
Lord, save your people.
Be merciful to us sinners, Lord, hear our prayer.
That you will spare us,
That you will pardon us,
That it may please you to bring us to true
penance,
Guide and protect your holy Church,
Preserve in holy religion the Pope, and all
those in holy Orders,
Humble the enemies of holy Church,
Give peace and unity to the whole Christian
people,
Bring back to the unity of the Church all
those who are straying, and bring all
unbelievers to the light of the Gospel,
Strengthen and preserve us in your holy
service,
Raise our minds to desire the things of
heaven,
Reward all our benefactors with eternal
blessings,
Deliver our souls from eternal damnation,
and the souls of our brethren, relatives,
and benefactors,
Give and preserve the fruits of the earth,
Grant eternal rest to all the faithful departed,
That it may please You to hear and heed
us, Jesus, Son of the Living God,
Lord, hear our prayer.
Lord, hear our prayer.
Lord, hear our prayer.

Lord, hear our prayer.
Lord, hear our prayer.
Lord, hear our prayer.
Lord, hear our prayer.

Lord, hear our prayer.
Lord, hear our prayer.

Lord, hear our prayer.

Lord, hear our prayer.

Lord, hear our prayer.

Lord, hear our prayer.
Lord, hear our prayer.
Lord, hear our prayer.

Lamb of God, who takes away the sins of
the world,
Lamb of God, who takes away the sins of
the world,
Lamb of God, who takes away the sins of
the world,
Spare us, O Lord!Graciously hear us, O Lord!

Have mercy on us.

 

Christ, hear us,
Lord Jesus, hear our prayer.
Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, have mercy on us.
Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, graciously hear us
Lord Jesus, hear our prayer.
Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, have mercy on us.
Lord, have mercy on us.

 

 

Men of virtue — or thoughts on ‘what is a gentleman?’

Men of virtue — or thoughts on ‘what is a gentleman?’

gentleman |ˈjentlmən|

noun ( pl. gentlemen )
a chivalrous, courteous, or honorable man: he behaved like a perfect gentleman.

-New Oxford American Dictionary-

The other day on the phone my son told me he sent flowers to his girlfriend who having an extremely busy week in the run-up to an international event her firm is hosting. Good move.

The next day I saw Facebook photos of my other son wearing a suit before a college homecoming dance, complete with a purple tie to flatter his girlfriend’s dress. Nice touch.

My husband and I recently went out to a pretty upscale French restaurant to mark our anniversary. And he brought a card, complete with a note inside from him. Words are big on my love-language list. This man never misses on this count. He is big on hand holding and door holding too. He’ll even hold my purse for me when asked.

This is the same man who helps me run a large bible study every week. He leads a discussion group. He helps set up and put away the supplies. He locks up and make sure everything is safe and secure when its over. His generous courtesies actions allow me to take final personal questions and visit with the participants who’d like to spend a little extra time. I’m grateful for it all.

For women, a man being a gentleman is not just about courtesy and gallant gestures… it’s more about the virtues that motivate them. It makes women ask: who is the man within?

In the last week my news feeds keep sending me gentlemanly posts and I thought I’d share a few with you.

In 4 Signs of a True Gentleman, Dale Partridge, now father to a daughter, is in a kind of quest to really be the first gentleman in his daughter’s life. He offers this as numero uno:

1. He Puts All Women Before Himself
Being a gentlemen has no bounds of an intimate relationship. It is a badge a man should carry with him at all times. A true gentlemen treats his mother, sisters, female friends and all feminine acquaintances with admiration and regard. He is in constant search of ways to honor and uphold the value of his female counterpart. Whether through listening, defending or affirming, a true gentlemen is a source of strength to all women, not just the one he desires.

- See the other 3 items.  

That’s a pretty tall order. Yet it is another way of saying, love your neighbor. Or extend respect to all women. For respect precedes love. I always told my daughter, back in her dating days… pay attention to how a man treats his mother and his sister. It will tell you much.

Over at CatholicMom.com, Ginny Moyer writes “What it Means to Be a “Gentleman” (And Why a Mom Should Care)“. In it she describes the gift of courtesy, too, and she also talks about a man’s inbred notion of the dignity of the human person — his treatment of the other — as a necessary core value.

A gentleman sees the innate human dignity of others, all others.  Remember in Pride and Prejudice, when Elizabeth goes to Darcy’s home and hears from the housekeeper about how well he treats all the workers on his estate?  Previously, she had accused him of not being a gentleman, but a testimony like that goes a long way towards altering her initial opinion.  You can be fairly certain you’re on a date with a gentleman when he is genuinely and unostentatiously kind to the guy who refills the water glasses.

Read the rest.

I came across a fairly young blog for men called, The Catholic Gentlemen, written by Sam Guzman, the communications director for Pro-Life Wisconsin. He is pretty direct in calling men not only to gentlemanly behavior, but to holiness. He writes that there is a “man crisis” in the Church today and his call to radical faith in the teachings of Christ and his Church. You’ll get a taste of that from this recent post post on “12 Ways to be a Committed Catholic Man. ” Besides calling men to a deep faith in Jesus Christ… his #5 on his list of 12 is all about the Eucharist.

Discover the majestic manliness of the Mass – The Mass is the “source and summit” of the Catholic faith, and yet, the majority of men claim to “be bored by the Mass” and to “not get anything out of the Mass”. This is because they don’t know what is occurring in the Mass: they have little understanding of the manly symbolism of the Mass, a Sacrament that has been devoutly passed down for 2000 years. They don’t realize that during the Mass they are witnesses to the actual Bloody Sacrifice of Jesus Christ on the Cross. If a man doesn’t actively participate in the Mass because of ignorance and boredom, he can’t receive the Graces that flow from the Eucharist. Learn the Mass to such a degree that you can explain it to others with the reverence and devotion that Christ’s Sacrifice deserves.

Read all 12 of Guzman’s list.

BONUS from Guzman: Chesterton’s Rule of Drinking.

The holiness factor — men with virtue — this is what we women are seeking.

image

Of Note: a Vatican-based colloquium on the Complementarity of Man and Woman

Of Note: a Vatican-based colloquium on the Complementarity of Man and Woman

From Nov 17-19, the Vatican is hosting an international interreligious colloquium on the Complementarity of Man and Women. Some details are over at the Italian-based website Humanum. 

From the website:

The Complementarity of Man and Woman: An International Colloquium is a gathering of leaders and scholars from many religions across the globe, to examine and propose anew the beauty of the relationship between the man and the woman, in order to support and reinvigorate marriage and family life for the flourishing of human society.

Witnesses will draw from
 the wisdom of their religious tradition and cultural experience as they attest to the power and vitality of the complementary union of man and woman. It is hoped that the colloquium be a catalyst for creative language and projects, as well as for global solidarity, in the work
 of strengthening the nuptial relationship, both for the good of the spouses themselves and for the good of all who depend upon them.

The Colloquium is sponsored by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and co-sponsored by the Pontifical Council for the Family, the Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue, and
 the Pontifical Council for the Promotion of Christian Unity.

The program will bring together scholars and others from around the world to discuss the complementarity of the sexes, marriage, family, and “the sacramentality of human love according to Saint John Paul II”, otherwise known as the theology of the body, and more.

Archbishop Charles Chaput will be there to talk about next year’s World Meeting of Families in Philadelphia. Sister Prudence Allen, a brilliant writer, whose love of the writings of John Paul II and the feminine genius helped to launch Endow,  will also be there.  (Yes, I’d like to be fly on the wall.)

Here’s one of the videos from Humanum.

:::

Others reporting:

Crux 

Catholic News Service

Religion News Service.

A report out of Utah on Mormon leader attending.

 

This makes me think… the indispensable relationship of Jesus to the Church

“The Church is apostolic because she is founded on the preaching and prayer of the apostles, on the authority that was entrusted to them by Christ himself.  St Paul writes to the Christians at Ephesus: “You are no longer strangers or sojourners, but you are fellow citizens with the saints and members of the household of God, built upon the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Christ Jesus being the cornerstone” (Eph 2: 19-20); that is, he compares Christians to living stones that form an edifice that is the Church, and this edifice is founded on the apostles, who are like columns, and the cornerstone that carries it all is Jesus himself. Without Jesus the Church cannot exist! Jesus is the foundation of the Church — the foundation! The apostles lived with Jesus, they listened to his words, they shared his life; above all they were witnesses of his death and resurrection. Our faith, the Church that Christ willed, is not based on an idea; it is not based on a philosophy. It is based on Christ himself.”

-Pope Francis-
General Audience, October 16, 2013.

Coming Up Nov. 8:  Long Island NY’s Women’s Conference — with yours truly & team

Coming Up Nov. 8: Long Island NY’s Women’s Conference — with yours truly & team

Come join me for a day-long event this Saturday, November 8th! The day features Mass plus three main talks adapted from my award-winning book, Blessed, Beautiful, and BodaciousI’m pleased to be womens_conference_2014_231x273_231x273joined by three dynamic women — Peggy Clores, Bridget McCormack, and Angela Rizzo — who will share the podium and with testimonials on the how the feminine genius shapes their dignity, gifts, and mission. Eileen Benthal will provide the music ministry.

It will be a privilege to present this day “back home” in New York, after my move to New England twenty years ago. The event will be at St Joseph’s Church in Babylon, NY. Register here.