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Among Women 209: Women Leaving the Abortion Industry, with Abby Johnson

Among Women 209: Women Leaving the Abortion Industry, with Abby Johnson

This latest episode of Among Women is poignant and powerful. My guest, Abby Johnson, works in a ministry “And Then There Were None”, dedicated to helping women come out of the abortion industry. Her new book is riveting: The Walls are Talking: Screen Shot 2016-05-10 at 9.23.48 AMFormer Abortion Clinic Workers Tell Their StoriesTogether we talk about how our committed friendship and love can help more women say no to abortion and re-start lives outside of the industry.

In our “Blessed are They” segment, I’m happy to be reading an excerpt from Melanie Rigney’s Blessed Are You that profiles the life of St Gianna Beretta Molla. Plus I share about Holy Doors and the Year of Mercy. Listen here to this new episode, or find #209 on iTunes.

Among Women Espresso Shot: The Wisdom of St Katharine Drexel

Among Women Espresso Shot: The Wisdom of St Katharine Drexel

Screen Shot 2016-02-20 at 4.50.29 PMListen to Episode 7 of Among Women “Espresso Shot”– a short strong coffee break of faith sharing and teaching from Pat Gohn.

Today’s topic: The Wisdom of St Katharine Drexel

Following up on my recent post, this short podcast dives into some of the writings of St Katharine Drexel. We recently passed her feast day, March 3, and as we press on in Lent, I share some timely inspiration from this American saint.

FYI: Among Women 18 (Dating back to 2009!) also has more biographical information about Katharine Drexel. Listen here.

Among Women 202: Chastity is for Lovers with Arleen Spenceley

Among Women 202: Chastity is for Lovers with Arleen Spenceley

Screen Shot 2016-01-10 at 10.13.08 AMIn this latest episode of Among Women the subject is the virtue of chastity and my guest, Arleen Spenceley, is a writer for the Tampa Bay Times. A few years back, an essay she wrote on being a chaste single adult garnered much discussion in print and went viral online. All this led to her book release Chastity is for Lovers: Single, Happy, and (Still) a Virgin. Join us for a discussion of the influence of St John Paul’s thoughts on love between the sexes, and how chastity is a virtue every person must cultivate.

Also in this episode, a look at a Welch saint who rivals St Valentine as a saint for lover, St Dwynden.

Listen and share this episode!

 

This makes me think… “I would rather die loving you, than live without you.” – St John Vianney

“Hope does not disappoint us, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts by the Holy Spirit who has been given to us.” -Romans 5:5

Prayer… draws everything into the love by which we are loved in Christ and which enables us to respond to him by loving as he has loved us. Love is the source of prayer; whoever draws from it reaches the summit of prayer. In the words of the Cure of Ars:

I love you, O my God, and my only desire is to love you until the last breath of my life. I love you, O my infinitely lovable God, and I would rather die loving you, than live without loving you. I love you, Lord, and the only grace I ask is to love you eternally. . . . My God, if my tongue cannot say in every moment that I love you, I want my heart to repeat it to you as often as I draw breath. (St Jean Vianney, Prayer)

Catechism of the Catholic Church, par. 2658

:::

Want to learn more about St Jean Vianney? He is an inspiration to all priests and believers. Listen to this 10-minute homily about his life and heart. H/T to Fr Michael Duffy.

This makes me think… about the divine face, the incarnation…

The Divine Image

by William Blake (1757-1827)

To Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love
All pray in their distress;
And to these virtues of delight
Return their thankfulness.

 

For Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love
Is God, our father dear,
And Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love
Is Man, his child and care.

 

For Mercy has a human heart,
Pity a human face,
And Love, the human form divine,
And Peace, the human dress.

 

Then every man, of every clime,
That prays in his distress,
Prays to the human form divine,
Love, Mercy, Pity, Peace.

 

And all must love the human form,
In heathen, Turk, or Jew;
Where Mercy, Love, and Pity dwell
There God is dwelling too.

This makes me think… about “those” people who put up with me…

Lord, this is the other person,
with whom I do not see eye to eye.
He belongs to you.
You have created him;
you have allowed him, it not wanted him,
to be just as he is.
If you can bear with him, my God,
then I too will bear with him and put up with him,
just as you bear with and put up with me.

– Karl Rahner-

This makes me think…

The Church’s proclamation on the family finds its foundation in the life and preaching of Jesus, who lived and grew up in the family of Nazareth. He attended the wedding at Cana, which he honoured by performing the first of his “signs” (cf. Jn 2:1-11) and presented himself as the Bridegroom who unites himself to his Bride (cf. Jn 3:29). On the cross, he gave himself up with a love to the very end and, in his resurrected body, established new relationships among people. By revealing the fullness of divine mercy, Jesus allows man and woman to recover that “principle” according to which God unites them in one flesh (cf. Mt 19:4-6) and for which — by the grace of Christ — they are enabled to be faithful to each other and love each other forever. Therefore, the divine measure of conjugal love, to which spouses are called by grace, has its source in “the beauty of the saving love of God made manifest in Jesus Christ who died and rose from the dead” (EG, 36), the very heart of the Gospel.

Jesus, in assuming human love, also perfected it (cf. GS, 49), giving man and woman a new manner of loving, which has its foundation in the irrevocable faithfulness of God. In light of this, the Letter to the Ephesians has identified in the married love between a man and a woman, “the great mystery” which makes present in this world the love between Christ and the Church (cf.Eph 5:31-32). A married couple possesses the charism (cf. 1 Cor 7:7) of building up the Church with their spousal love and the task of the procreation and rearing of children. United in an indissoluble sacramental bond, the spouses live the beauty of love, fatherhood and motherhood and the dignity of participating, in this way, in God’s creative work.

 Throughout the centuries, the Church has maintained her constant teaching on marriage and family. One of the highest expressions of this teaching was proposed by the Second Vatican Council, in the Pastoral Constitution Gaudium et Spes, which devotes an entire chapter to promoting the dignity of marriage and the family (cf. GS, 47-52). This document defined marriage as a community of life and love (cf. GS, 48), placing love at the center of the family and manifesting, at the same time, the truth of this love in counter distinction to the various forms of reductionism present in contemporary culture. The “true love between husband and wife” (GS, 49) implies a mutual gift of self and includes and integrates the sexual and affective aspects, according to the divine plan (cf. GS, 48-49). Furthermore, Gaudium et Spes, 48 emphasizes the grounding of the spouses in Christ. Christ the Lord “comes into the lives of married Christians through the Sacrament of Matrimony,” and remains with them. In the Incarnation, he assumes human love, purifies it and brings it to fulfillment. Through his Spirit, he enables the bride and groom to live their love and makes that love permeate every part of their lives of faith, hope and charity. In this way, the bride and groom are, so to speak, consecrated and, through his grace, they build up the Body of Christ and are a domestic Church (cf. LG, 11), so that the Church, in order to fully understand her mystery, looks to the Christian family, which manifests her in a real way.

Instrumentum Laboris, par. 2,3, & 4-

“The Pastoral Challenges of the Family in the Context of Evangelization” (in preparation for the Synod on the Family this fall)

 

 

The F.U.N. Quotient … the 16min smile make-over edition (video)

A cheerful heart is a good medicine,
but a downcast spirit dries up the bones.
Proverbs 17: 22

I saw this short film a few years back. Someone I love needs to know this now. Maybe you do, too.